Ambassador Highlight of the Week: Jacob Asgain

The Value of an Internship

Name: Jacob Asgain
Hometown: Smithville, MO, but Portland, Oregon if we’re being technical…
Major: Civil Engineering
Year: Senior
Clubs: ASCE, Tau Beta Pi, Chi Epsilon
Favorite class: Construction Management
Favorite place to study: The conference/study rooms by the CME faculty offices
Why you chose UMKC: UMKC is close to home, not expensive, and it has a great Civil Engineering program.

 

Coming by my first internship was not as easy of a task as I would’ve expected. Being an honors student, many school related things (like homework and studying) came naturally to me, so when I didn’t get the first internship that I applied for (nor the second, third, and many more) it was a strange feeling. Throughout my freshman and sophomore years while my peers were starting their internships, I was still struggling to find one. It wasn’t until the spring semester of my junior year that I obtained my first internship and started working a relevant job that I would be proud to have on my resume.

My first internship was a desk job working as an engineering technician intern, which is a fancy way of saying “I work in auto-cad all day”. Many people enjoy doing this work and I don’t mean to put it down, but it wasn’t the type of work for me. I took this job so I could get relevant experience on my resume, but I am more thankful that I took it because I learned what I did not want to do in my professional career.

My second internship was as a construction inspection intern. I spent the majority of my time out in the field as opposed to being behind a desk all day. I really enjoyed this internship. It made me want to pursue a career in the construction industry after I graduate.

The experiences I had at these two internships have really guided me in my career search. I know what I do (and do not) enjoy, which makes it much easier to apply for jobs. Had it not been for these internships, I probably would’ve taken the first job I had been offered. Now I know that the job I apply for will be a job that I actually want to do.

Alumni Q+A: Ryan Fowler

Ryan William Fowler
Mechanical Facility Engineer and Energy Coordinator, Orbital ATK Lake City AAP
Bachelors of Science in Mechanical Engineering, Class of 2012
Current City: Blue Springs, MO Hometown: Blue Springs, MO

 
Tell us about your job.
At my job I get involved with managing the plants integrated building management control system, HVAC systems, boiler/steam systems, and all aspects of energy management. I often have construction projects I am responsible for deterring technical requirements and in some cases supervise field work.

One project I particularly enjoyed was the design and implementation of a reverse osmosis treatment system at the Lake City Boiler Plant. I am part of the plant’s master planning process which determines the needs and requirements which will keep the facility in working order for many years to come.

I worked at my company throughout college and interned in facilities engineering. They kept me on once I graduated. I fit very well in this type of engineering and would recommend it to anyone.

How do you balance your work life with your personal life?
I work when I am scheduled to work and I’m home when I’m scheduled to be home. Keeping the two separate and staying focused on what’s important at the time allows me to manage my time well and keep a healthy balance between the two.
Sure there are overlaps every now and then, but they are few and far between. Family comes first, and if you’re working somewhere that doesn’t respect that then it might be time to seek other opportunities.

What advice do you have for students entering the field?
One step at a time. Listen to the experienced engineers in your group and ask a ton of questions, they will be your greatest ally in conquering this new and exciting world. You will make mistakes and you will learn from them. It’s all part of becoming a good engineer. Hang in there; this is where all the fun happens!

Ambassador Highlight of the Week: Max Schoettger

Transferring to UMKC

Name: Max Schoettger
Hometown: Kansas City, MO
Major: Information Technology, Business
Year: Senior
Favorite class: IT 222 – Multimedia Design
Favorite place to study: Miller Nichols Library, 2nd floor
Why you chose UMKC: Kansas City is my home city, plus UMKC was close and there are job opportunities with tech companies.

My college journey started at a different four-year university. In the two years I was there, I made a lot of mistakes, both personally and academically, at a place I didn’t feel welcome at. Transferring universities and changing degrees in the middle of my undergraduate experience was a tough decision, but one that I felt I needed to take for my own personal benefit. As I returned home to the Kansas City area, I was also interested in changing my area of study from engineering to information technology. UMKC’s School of Computing and Engineering ended up being the perfect fit for me during a very challenging period of time. The school offered a bachelor’s program in information technology that I was able to get into right away. UMKC advisors worked with me to match existing engineering credits to degree requirements in the IT program to make the most of the hours I had already earned.
 
During my first semester at UMKC, the computer science classes I took caught my interest in a way no other subject had before. Learning all about computers, what they can do, and how they make the world work was something I truly became passionate about. UMKC’s relationships with some of the top tech companies in Kansas City will ensure that the skills that I acquire in the classroom can turn into a great internship or entry-level job to start my career. Aside from the academic pros of changing degrees and universities, the change in campus environment has been my favorite part about transferring to UMKC. Right in the middle of the city I have lived in my whole life is a diverse university with many different opportunities full of interesting people from all walks of life. It’s a place where I feel like I belong. 

Enhancing Infrastructure For Cuba

Team UMKC, composed of graduate students Andy Roberts, AJ Ramsey, and Ryan Holmes, are finalists in the 2017 Cuban Infrastructure Scholarship Competition! The Cuba Infrastructure Challenge is a student design competition organized and sponsored by the Association of Cuban-American Engineers (ACAE) and the Cuban-American Association of Civil Engineers (C-AACE). It entails that university student teams formulate and present a project of their choice on Cuba’s public infrastructure that relates to the engineering field in transportation, water resources, power/ telecommunications or healthcare. This competition aims to improve the quality of life for Cubans and establish meaningful relationships between Cuban-Americans and students. The ACAE has organized this competition for engineering students from around the United States to propose, investigate, and engineer solutions that enhance infrastructure in Cuba.
 
Team UMKC was accepted on February 13, 2017 as a top 6 team in the nation to present and discuss their proposal entitled: Feasibility Study of Baracoa, Cuba as “Sponge City.” The competition is to be held at the University of Miami in Miami, FL on March 4 (TODAY!) between 8:00AM to 2:00PM and will be live streamed on Youtube.com. A potential $12,000 in award money is available for top-ranked presentations in addition to national esteem.
 
This will provide an excellent opportunity for the participating graduate students to meet and develop relationships with civil engineering professionals across the world. Because of the high visibility of the live stream and importance of Cuban relations, this competition will also advance UMKC’s prominence as an international research institution and cultivator of globally influential leaders.
 
Tune in to the live stream on Saturday, March 4, 2017 at 7:00am.
(Update):

Team UMKC composed of Ryan Holmes, AJ Ramsey, and Andrew Roberts returned home on March 5th from Miami as third place winners in a national competition for the Cuba Infrastructure Scholarship Competition.

A total of $12,000 in scholarships was up for grabs through this support of The Cuban-American Association of Civil Engineers and The Association of Cuban-American Engineers. The event was hosted by the University of Miami at the beautiful Casa Bacardi. The intent of the scholarship and the goal of the organization is to promote infrastructure and technology that could benefit a future free-enterprise Cuba. Team UMKC submitted a rigorously judged proposal entitled “Feasibility Study of Baracoa, Cuba As a Sponge City” and was one of 6 teams across the nation invited to present. Each team had 15 minutes to describe their proposals to the 5 esteemed judges, each with over 40 years of experience in their respective fields. This was followed by 10 minutes of question and answer to evaluate some of the more detailed and technical aspects of the proposal.

It is the hope of Team UMKC that participation in this competition results in sown seeds towards international cooperation especially with the Hispanic community. As a team, they also desire to set a precedence and a challenge to other engineering students for similar competitions to demonstrate how Roos engage as national and international members of society.

Team UMKC would like to thank the School of Graduate Studies and the Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering for their generous support in providing the travel funds necessary to attend this competition. A special thanks to Dean Truman for originally circulating this opportunity.

Ambassador Highlight of the Week: Terry Bondy

Name: Terry Bondy
Major: Civil Engineering
Year: Senior
Clubs: SCE Student Council, Tau Beta Pi
Favorite class: CE 321: Structural Analysis
Favorite place to study: Miller Nichols Library on the 4th floor
Why you chose UMKC: Lots of scholarships are available for students

What In the World is Civil Engineering?

When I tell people I’m majoring in civil engineering, the most common response is “Oh, so you are going to, like, build stuff?” Most people don’t have a clue what civil engineers do. I certainly didn’t have a very good idea either when I started this program a few years ago. Because it is a very broad engineering degree, it can be hard to explain sometimes. There are five industries that people typically work in as civil engineers: construction, structural, geotechnical, hydrological, and traffic engineering.

During my freshman year, I wanted to work as a hydrological engineer. I thought I would enjoy working with streams, rivers, and keeping the environment clean from pollution. However, I found myself enjoying my structural classes more. Statics, Structural Analysis, Steel Design, and Reinforced Concrete all seemed more interesting to me.

The first thing I like about structural engineering is how many different materials are available. I can use steel, wood, concrete, and masonry to build structures. Each has unique properties that make it the better or worse material to use in certain situations. Another thing I look forward to as a structural engineer is working with different industries. I can build hospitals, schools, office buildings, or power plants. Few professions offer the opportunity to work with such a variety of clients. Third, I want to be a structural engineer because it gives me the opportunity to help other people and communities in a meaningful, lasting way. With a Structural Engineer license, I can build structures for people all around the world.

Learn more about civil engineering at UMKC.