Ryan Holmes Receives Prestigious ASCE Fellowship

Recently, SCE Ph.D. student, Ryan Holmes, was awarded a prestigious American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Fellowship. Ryan took the time to share more about his fellowship, his interest in civil engineering, and why he decided to come to UMKC.

Congratulations on being awarded an ASCE Fellowship! Can you tell us more about it?

Thank you! The ASCE Freeman Fellowship is a national fellowship set up by one of ASCE’s past presidents, John R. Freeman, in 1924 to encourage future civil engineers working in hydraulics and hydraulic engineering. Hydraulic engineering is a subset of civil engineering dealing with water flow systems especially for the purpose of providing clean water. For my submission I described some of my work towards modeling flow through a unique filter system we are developing here at UMKC.

What first drew you to civil engineering?

I have wanted to be a civil engineer since middle school. I was drawn to civil engineering because it provides the best of two worlds, creative inventiveness and practical application. Lots of people have great ideas but lack the understanding of the systems to build them. Alternatively, others know the places where improvements are needed but don’t have the time or energy to explore the innumerable, potential solutions. I want to interface between these two groups as having both the knowledge of available answers and the understanding of how those solutions can be implemented.

What have you learned from working with your mentor, Dr. Hart?

Dr. Hart has taught me that multifaceted knowledge base is the core of all civil engineers. Her expertise in soils, geochemistry, and hydrogeology has been an invaluable resource to me. She also has practical experience in environmental engineering. While I’m work towards developing a filter for purifying groundwater, she helps direct my inquisitiveness towards solving the practical side – the chemistry of clean water – and addressing the questions around implementation – how to explain this process to people in the Environmental Protection Agency or Department of Defense.

What made you decide to come to UMKC?

I decided to come to UMKC because I was born and raised in Kansas City. I wanted to go to a school that had a reputation for civil engineering and a community impact – so UMKC was a natural choice. There are UMKC graduates at almost every engineering firm in the city and at most construction, concrete, or mining facilities. I think this is not just a reflection on the quality of civil engineers UMKC produces, but the way the program is structured to integrate future engineers with the existing local experts.

What advice would you give to undergraduate engineering students?

My advice for undergraduates is firstly to cultivate relationships with the people in your classes and in your internships. These will be the people you will go to for help or job placement in the future. Secondly, keep leaning in to learning everything you can, but be humble enough to admit you don’t know everything.

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